Sierra Club Connecticut Chapter - Greater Hartford Group




Monthly Meetings:

Meetings are held at Westmoor Park on the second Thursday of the month.  There are no meetings in July and August.  All meetings and outings are open to members and the general public.  New members are especially welcome.  Refreshments are served but please bring your own coffee mug.

View Larger Map_







Greater Hartford Group Monthly meeting:

April 9th. 7 PM

Title: Your Organic Garden Wants What Earth Wants by  Bill Duesing, Organic Advocate for CT Northeast Organic Farming Association.

Description: Bill  will discuss how you can have greater biodiversity, less energy use and little to no added fertilizer while maximizing vegetables and flower gardening success as you help solve Earth's three biggest problems.  Learn practical solutions to have a longer season with more food.  Bring questions.

Doors open at 7:00 for refreshments and letter writing
A small donation is requested.
Questions:  Rich at 860-816-1705

In addition there will be a letter to your representative to sign on to. It's about the bee situation and here is some background.

Around the world, bees are dying at alarming rates and new science is pointing to the world’s most popular class of pesticides called neonicotinoids (also called neonics), made by giant chemical companies Bayer and Syngenta, as the key factor in the global bee die-off.

These key pollinators need our help. Without immediate action to save bees, which pollinate two-thirds of our food crops, everything from almonds to strawberries could disappear from supermarket shelves.

Fortunately, Representatives John Conyers (D, Mich.) and Earl Blumenauer (D, Ore.) just introduced a bill to give our bees a fighting chance. The “Save America’s Pollinators Act” will suspend the use of toxic, bee-killing pesticides until a full review of scientific evidence indicates they are safe and a field study demonstrates they do no harm to bees and other pollinators.

This past spring, the European Union placed a two year ban on most neonics -- but the EPA is dragging its feet, ignoring mounting scientific evidence and delaying action until 2018. The bees can't wait, and neither can we.

Here's a sample letter to send your US Congressman to stand up for bees today! 

DATE

Rep. _______________:

ADDRESS:

Re: Support the “Save America's Pollinators Act” and protect our bees

Dear Rep. ___________________,

I am a registered voter in your district and am writing to urge you to cosponsor H.R. 2692, the Save America's Pollinators Act.  Our bees and other pollinators are in trouble.  In the last decade the phenomenon of Colony Collapse Disorder has resulted in a sharp decline in honey bee populations around the world.  A growing body of scientific evidence points to the widespread and indiscriminate use of a class of neurotoxic pesticides called neonicotinoids as a key factor in this phenomenon.

Pollinator losses represent a serious threat to America’s food security and agricultural production. Bees are essential in producing – one out of three bites of food we eat every day and roughly 75 percent of our global food crops, from nuts and soybeans to squash and cucumbers, from apples, oranges, cherries and blueberries to avocados, peaches and melons rely on bees for pollination. Honey bees contribute nearly $20 billion to the U.S. economy and $217 billion to the global economy.

Since 2006, beekeepers have reported annual losses of at least 30 percent each winter (normal rates are 5-10 percent). This past winter, beekeepers from Texas to California reported that the epidemic CCD decimated 50-70 percent of their bees -- the worst year since this phenomenon was recognized. In July 2013, 37 million bees were reported dead across a single farm in Ontario. Almond farmers, berry farmers and others in the United States are facing shortages of bees necessary to pollinate their crops, and the cost to farmers of renting bees for pollination services has increased by up to 20 percent. 

Neonicotinoids are now the most widely used insecticides in the world and their use has been repeatedly shown to have lethal and sub-lethal effects on bees, other pollinators and beneficial insects. For example, in June of 2013, just as communities celebrated National Pollinator Week, 50,000 bumblebees were killed as a direct result of exposure to a neonic applied to trees for cosmetic purposes.

EPA granted a conditional registration to the neonicotinoid clothianidin in 2003 without the required field study on pollinator impacts. This requirement has never been met, yet clothianidin remains one of the most commonly used insecticides more than decade after EPA found it had insufficient basis for registration requirements.

EPA has delayed review of neonicotinoid registration until 2018. However, if current rates of bee die-offs continue, it’s unlikely that the beekeeping industry will survive this delayed timeline, putting our agriculture industry and our food supply at serious risk.

The bees can’t wait, and neither can we.  Congress must take action to spur the EPA to take immediate action to protect bees. Please help protect bees and other important pollinators by supporting H.R. 2692, the Save America's Pollinators Act.

Sincerely,
NAME/ADDRESS
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Hike Bolton Notch!
  CANCELLED! SORRY

Let’s hope it's feeling like spring enough to wander the rail to trail at Bolton Notch Pond on Saturday, March 21st. We meet 10:00am at the Shady Glen restaurant, 840 Middle Turnpike East, Manchester, on Rte. 6 on the Manchester / Bolton line.  We can have a long or short hike there by simply turning around or not. If at least one other person RSVP's here yes only by Friday, March 20th, I won't hike closer to home instead. 

Directions: Rte. I-84 E to Rte. 384 E, exit 5, Rte. 85.  End of ramp turn left.  Go up and down hill to a light.  That is Rte. 6.  Turn left.  Restaurant c. 1.5 miles ahead on left. Friendly dogs are welcome to run as we walk but must be leashed as others approach us. Messes on the trail must be removed.  All hikers, adults and children over 10 years old, with or without dogs, are welcome at this free drop in event as long as they refrain from cell phone use and smoking and can tolerate our dogs running about them.

SNOW / RAIN  CANCELS AS WELL AS REMAINING DEEP SNOW: PLEASE CHECK WITH ME DAY BEFORE.
Hope to see you on the trail! Take care, Renee
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


Hike Bolton Notch Pond, Saturday, March 28 10am (Simsbury, CT)

Let’s walk the rail to trail at Bolton Notch Pond on Saturday, March 28th. We meet 10:00am at the Shady Glen restaurant, 840 Middle Turnpike East, Manchester, on Rte. 6 on the Manchester / Bolton line. Please RSVP here yes only by Friday, March 27th.  If you change your mind please tell me in case you were the only hiker.  

Directions: Rte. I-84 E to Rte. 384 E, exit 5, Rte. 85.  End of ramp turn left.  Go up and down hill to a light.  That is Rte. 6.  Turn left.  Restaurant c. 1.5 miles ahead on left. Friendly dogs are welcome to run as we walk but must be leashed as others approach us. Messes on the trail must be removed. 

All hikers, adults and children over 10 years old, with or without dogs, are welcome at this free drop in event as long as they refrain from cell phone use and smoking and are ok with dogs present.
SNOW / RAIN  CANCELS AS WELL AS REMAINING DEEP SNOW: PLEASE CHECK WITH ME DAY BEFORE.

Hope to see you on the trail!
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


Barkhamsted Hike! March 29 at 1p.m. A 4.2 mile round-trip, out-and-back hike on a section of the Tunxis Trail in Barkhamsted. Moderate difficulty over rolling terrain with a 450 foot elevation gain, at a fast pace.  Beautiful mountain laurel lined trail, diverse forest and a pine plantation, culminating in a cliff cradling house-sized boulders with small caves. Free. All ages welcome.  No hiking experience required, but must be able to keep pace with the group. No dogs, please.  Brings snacks and water, and be prepared for slushy, muddy or snowy conditions.

From the west take Route 8 to Winsted and follow Route 44 East for 3.2 miles and turn left on Route 318 East. Continue for about 3 miles to the junction of Route 219 past the dam, and proceed east on Route 219 for 1.7 mile to a small parking area on the right, just before Hillcrest Drive. From Hartford take Route 44 West for 15-20 miles to New Hartford and turn right onto Route 219 East. Proceed to the junction with Route 318 past the dam and continue for 1.7 miles to the parking area.  Questions or carpooling contact Amanda at 860-416-0081 or email me here.
  
____________________________________________________________________________________________

Howdy,
Let’s walk the rail to trail at Bolton Notch Pond on Saturday, April 4th.  We meet 10:00am at the Shady Glen restaurant, 840 Middle Turnpike East, Manchester, on Rte. 6 on the Manchester / Bolton line.  Please RSVP here yes only by Friday, April 3rd.  If you change your mind please tell me in case you were the only hiker.

Directions: Rte. I-84 E to Rte. 384 E, exit 5, Rte. 85. End of ramp turn left.  Go up and down hill to a light. That is Rte. 6.  Turn left.  Restaurant c. 1.5 miles ahead on left.  Friendly dogs are welcome but must be leashed as others approach us. Messes on the trail must be removed.

All hikers, adults and children over 10 years old, with or without dogs, are welcome at this free drop in event as long as they refrain from cell phone use and smoking and are ok with dogs.  SNOW / RAIN CANCELS AS WELL AS REMAINING DEEP SNOW: PLEASE CHECK WITH ME DAY BEFORE.

Hope to see you on the trail!
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Howdy,
Let’s walk the rail to trail at Bolton Notch Pond on Sunday, April 19th.  We meet 10:00am at the Shady Glen restaurant, 840 Middle Turnpike East, Manchester, on Rte. 6 on the Manchester / Bolton line.  Please RSVP here yes only by Friday, April 3rd.  If you change your mind please tell me in case you were the only hiker.

Directions: Rte. I-84 E to Rte. 384 E, exit 5, Rte. 85.  End of ramp turn left.  Go up and down hill to a light.  That is Rte. 6.  Turn left.  Restaurant c. 1.5 miles ahead on left.  Friendly dogs are welcome but must be leashed as others approach us.  Messes on the trail must be removed.

All hikers, adults and children over 10 years old, with or without dogs, are welcome at this free drop in event as long as they refrain from cell phone use and smoking and are ok with dogs.  SNOW / RAIN CANCELS AS WELL AS REMAINING DEEP SNOW: PLEASE CHECK WITH ME DAY BEFORE.

Hope to see you on the trail!
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

NEW! The Connecticut Chapter is pleased to introduce hikes geared toward younger adults. Please join us for the inaugural hike!

April 19, 2015 at 10:30a.m.  Young adult hike with the Sierra Club.  A 4.5 mile loop through People’s State Forest in Barkhamsted, including two outlooks over the Farmington River and Berkshire Hills, diverse forest, and historical village remains.  Prior hiking experience or physical conditioning required for the 650 foot strenuous, rocky ascent, moderating into rolling terrain.  Free.  All are welcome, especially those in their 20s and 30s.  No dogs, please.  Bring water, lunch, and sturdy shoes.  Heavy rain cancels.  Questions or carpooling contact Amanda at 860-416-0081 or email me here.

Directions:
From Hartford take Route 44 West for about 15-20 miles, or from Waterbury take Route 8 North to Winsted and follow Route 44 East for about 3 miles.

From the junction of Routes 44 and 318 in Barkhamsted, turn onto Route 318. Cross the bridge over the Farmington River and immediately turn left onto East River Road.  Continue for 2.5 miles to a small dirt parking area on the left.  Meet at trail head for Jesse Girard Trail, across from parking area.

All participants on Sierra Club outings are required to sign a standard liability waiver.  If you would like to read the liability waiver before you choose to participate on an outing, please go to, or contact the Outings Department at (415) 977-5528 for a printed version.
Comments